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Marines Hymn (U.S. Marine Corps) (Veterans Day)

Official song of the U.S. Marine Corps, the oldest official song of our armed forces. References such as "Halls of Montezuma" and "Shores of Tripoli" date anonymously from the 19th century, but the first official full text is found in a 1917 collection called "Rhymes of the Rookies" by W.E. Christian. The tune is considered to be most akin to a theme from Offenbach's 1867 operetta "Genevieve de Brabant."

My Buddy (Veterans Day)

Music by Walter Donaldson(1893-1947), lyrics by Gus Kahn(1886-1941), 1922. Between Donaldson & Kahn, separately and in collaboration, too many evergreens to list. "My Buddy" was routinely played in silent movie houses as the piano accompaniment for the film classic "Wings" (1927) set in WWI; and though written after the end of the conflict, its plaintive strains have always been associated with the Great War(1914-1918).

Navy Hymn (Veterans Day)

Original poem (inspired by Psalm 107) by William Whiting, 1860, set in 1861 to music by John B. Dykes, both collaborators British.

Oh! How I Hate To Get Up In The Morning (Veterans Day)

Words & music by Irving Berlin(1888-1989), from his 1918 WWI revue "Yip, Yip, Yaphank." All the production cast members were army men who toured the show throughout the provinces in support of the war effort. Twenty five years later, Berlin himself would perform the song on both stage and film as part of his WWII revue "This Is The Army."

Pledge Of Allegiance, The (Veterans Day)

Our oath of loyalty to the United States, composed by Francis Bellamy in 1892, revised for the final time in 1954 when the words "under God" were added. The Pledge is customarily recited by citizens holding their right hands over their hearts facing the flag. Non-uniform headgear is removed and held against the left shoulder while uniformed personnel offer the military salute.

Semper Paratus (U.S. Coast Guard) (Veterans Day)

"Always Ready", the motto of the U.S. Coast Guard since the 1830's. Words & music by Captain Francis Saltus Van Boskerck.